Tag Archives: book review

Lion – A Long Way Home by Saroo Brierly 

I saw many updates on Facebook after this movie was released how my friends and family loved watching it. I resisted temptation by not watching the movie first and got the book to read. Unfortunately because of work commitments I didn’t get around to reading it until I impulsively packed it in my bag to read it on holiday. 

Lion made fantastic poolside reading. I was stuck in the book from the word go and I recall getting goosebumps twice while reading it. 

Imagining little Saroo struggling to find his way home, going on the endless train ride, hunting for food, escaping from weirdoes and eventually ending up in Australia had me on edge. I’m still marvelling at how, in a population of a billion people, Saroo managed to find his way home all the way from Australia. 

I loved how the names remembered by a child were very differently written, how Ginestalay was something so totally different! You’ll have to read it to know why this was one of the reasons I had goosebumps. 

The journey is incredible and I had to slow down reading the book only because I didn’t want it to end. Read it, enjoy it, and pass the book on. I’ve given my copy to my daughter to read. 

Five Point Someone – Chetan Bhagat

I’ve actually never tried to find out why Indians in India have a thing against Chetan Bhagat. He seems to be constantly trolled and I get a bit worked up about such things. If you don’t like to read a certain genre of books, then just let it be. If you have a problem with his political or any other opinion, I’m sure he’s allowed to have one, just the way you are.

Anyway, all that aside and let’s get to reviewing the fourth book that I am reading this year. I know that Five Point Someone has a Bollywood movie based on the book, and I happened to have watched the movie before the reading the book. Ideally I prefer to read the book first! The movie is the very popular 3 Idiots! and it is directed by Raj Kumar Hirani.

Hari, Alok and Ryan are the three who have made it to one of the best engineering colleges in India. Their happiness and excitement is short lived when the daily monotony and rigorous academic work starts to take over, and unlike the movie, the book talks more about their ways to get out of this monotony. The novel is funny but does have some dark moments especially when focusing on the families of the protagonists.

As I read through it, I admit to constantly going back to the movie and trying to recall if a particular part had been added or not. Quite distracting! I need more discipline.

I enjoyed the book and I have a box set of Chetan Bhagat books that I brought back home with me from a visit to India. I can’t wait to start them.

five-point-someone-3-idiots

4/52

To Kill A Mockingbird – Harper Lee

In my quest to read at least one book a week my daughter, who is an avid reader, decided to share some of her books with me. She insisted I read Harper Lee’s To Kill A Mockingbird and I suddenly realised why she went through a phase of speaking in a heavy Southern accent after reading it. I admit to reading the book in Forrest Gump’s accent.

The tale is considered a classic and it’s about a lawyer and his advice to his children Scout and Jem Finch. Atticus Finch is defending a real mockingbird, a black man who has been charged with the rape of a white girl.

Race and class divides are evident in the Deep South in the 1930s and Harper Lee does a sterling job at capturing the warmth and the authenticity. Peppered with humour, the book makes for great reading. The hypocrisy of what went on will unnerve you at some points but you will definitely agree with me once you have read it that we need more than just one Atticus Finch in life.

‘Shoot all the bluejays you want, if you can hit ’em, but remember it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird.’

mockingbird

3/52