LAMHAA – The Untold Story of Kashmir

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Bed rest and me do not agree when directed under doctor’s orders. I’m only keen on taking a chill pill when I dictate it to myself because then I know I will not want to do anything but chill out. Sitting at home doing nothing but letting myself heal is boring. Day 2 into this ordeal that’s supposed to last at least a fortnight has me climbing on the walls – figuratively speaking.

I’d bought a copy of Lamhaa quite a few weeks back on the insistence of the fellow who sells me these bootleg copies. I just didn’t have the time to sit down and watch and I knew the storyline was about conflict in Kashmir and honestly speaking, I’d rather have watched a comedy instead. So I settled myself down with other things to do while I had Lamhaa on in the background and five minutes into the movie I realised I would be giving it all my attention instead of doing my nails.

Vikram Sabharwal is assigned by Indian Military Intelligence to go to Kashmir where he is to locate who is behind the violence.  Under the guise of a press reporter, Gul Jahangir he begins his investigation by visiting the Jama Masjid, Dardpura Village and Rainawari Chowk. He is accompanied by a tailor, Char Chinar, who sells uniforms to both militants and the underpaid military soldiers. Vikram meets up with Aziza Abbas Ansari, and her mentor, Haji Sayyed Shah, and aspiring political leader, Aatif Hussain. And it is after these meetings that he will conclude who is behind the extremism in this beautiful yet ‘most dangerous place on Earth’.

Sanjay Dutt is awesome and Bipasha Basu is fabulous in her non-glam role. This is the first movie ever that I have enjoyed of Bipasha’s. Karan Kapoor on the other hand may be eye candy but I’m not too keen on his acting skills. He wasn’t convincing enough. Anupam Kher was phenomenal and has always given more than full justice to any role he has ever undertaken. The musical score is good too and I absolutely love the track Madno which is a smooth flowing number, it has minimal instruments in the background and relies totally on vocals by Kshitij Tarey and Chinmayi.

Watch it if you haven’t already. I quite enjoyed it despite not ‘being into’ violent movies.

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